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Marijuana waste disposal—Liquids and solids.

Washington state reg, but should be standard everywhere....(1) Solid and liquid wastes generated during marijuana production and processing must be stored, managed, and disposed of in accordance with applicable state and local laws and regulations.
(2) Wastewater generated during marijuana production and processing must be disposed of in compliance with applicable state and local laws and regulations.
(3) Wastes from the production and processing of marijuana plants must be evaluated against the state's dangerous waste regulations (chapter  173-303 WAC) to determine if those wastes designate as dangerous waste. It is the responsibility of each waste generator to properly evaluate their waste to determine if it is designated as a dangerous waste. If a generator's waste does designate as a dangerous waste, then that waste(s) is subject to the applicable management standards found in chapter  173-303 WAC.
(a) Wastes that must be evaluated against the dangerous waste regulations include, but are not limited to, the following:
(i) Waste from marijuana flowers, trim and solid plant material used to create an extract (per WAC  314-55-104).
(ii) Waste solvents used in the marijuana process (per WAC  314-55-104).
(iii) Discarded plant waste, spent solvents and laboratory wastes from any marijuana processing or quality assurance testing.
(iv) Marijuana extract that fails to meet quality testing.
(b) Marijuana wastes that do not designate as dangerous shall be managed in accordance with subsection (4) of this section.
(c) A marijuana plant, usable marijuana, trim and other plant material in itself is not considered dangerous waste as defined under chapter  173-303 WAC unless it has been treated or contaminated with a solvent.
(4) Marijuana waste that does not designate as dangerous waste (per subsection (3) of this section) must be rendered unusable following the methods in subsection (5) of this section prior to leaving a licensed producer, processor, or laboratory. Disposal of the marijuana waste rendered unusable must follow the methods under subsection (6) of this section.
(a) Wastes that must be rendered unusable prior to disposal include, but are not limited to, the following:
(i) Waste evaluated per subsection (3) of this section and determined to not designate as "Dangerous Waste."
(ii) Marijuana plant waste, including roots, stalks, leaves, and stems that have not been processed with solvent.
(iii) Solid marijuana sample plant waste possessed by third-party laboratories accredited by the WSLCB to test for quality assurance that must be disposed of.
(iv) Other wastes as determined by the WSLCB.
(b) A producer or processor must provide the WSLCB a minimum of seventy-two hours notice in the traceability system described in WAC 314-55-083(4) prior to rendering the product unusable and disposing of it.
(5) The allowable method to render marijuana plant waste unusable is by grinding and incorporating the marijuana plant waste with other ground materials so the resulting mixture is at least fifty percent nonmarijuana waste by volume. Other methods to render marijuana waste unusable must be approved by the WSLCB before implementation.
Material used to grind with the marijuana falls into two categories: Compostable waste and noncompostable waste.
(a) Compostable mixed waste: Marijuana waste to be disposed as compost feedstock or in another organic waste method (for example, anaerobic digester) may be mixed with the following types of waste materials:
(i) Food waste;
(ii) Yard waste;
(iii) Vegetable based grease or oils; or
(iv) Other wastes as approved by the WSLCB.
(b) Noncompostable mixed waste: Marijuana waste to be disposed in a landfill or another disposal method (for example, incinerator) may be mixed with the following types of waste materials:
(i) Paper waste;
(ii) Cardboard waste;
(iii) Plastic waste;
(iv) Soil; or
(v) Other wastes as approved by the WSLCB.
(6) Marijuana wastes rendered unusable following the method described in subsection (4) of this section can be disposed.
(a) Disposal of the marijuana waste rendered unusable may be delivered to a permitted solid waste facility for final disposition. Examples of acceptable permitted solid waste facilities include:
(i) Compostable mixed waste: Compost, anaerobic digester, or other facility with approval of the jurisdictional health department.
(ii) Noncompostable mixed waste: Landfill, incinerator, or other facility with approval of the jurisdictional health department.
(b) Disposal of the marijuana waste rendered unusable may be managed on-site by the generator in accordance with the standards of chapter  173-350 WAC.
(c) A record of the final destination of marijuana waste rendered unusable.
[Statutory Authority: RCW  69.50.342 and  69.50.345. WSR 16-11-110, § 314-55-097, filed 5/18/16, effective 6/18/16; WSR 15-11-107, § 314-55-097, filed 5/20/15, effective 6/20/15. Statutory Authority: RCW  69.50.325,  69.50.331,  69.50.342,  69.50.345. WSR 13-21-104, § 314-55-097, filed 10/21/13, effective 11/21/13.]
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